Nota: Este contenido tiene una versión original en español

The historic Puebla de los Angeles is known for its emblematic and impressive buildings, which just by stepping foot in the Historic Center have the power to take anyone back to the past in the blink of an eye.

Puebla is not only inserted in the industrial movement, but also in the modernizing one regarding the world of amusements. Proof of this were the first movie theaters that were improvised salons and jacalones.

The history of cinema in Mexico began with the arrival of Gabriel Veyre from New York in July 1896, with the purpose of exhibiting the first films of the Lumiére brothers.

On August 14 of that year, the first public showing of films in Mexico took place.

In Puebla, there are still traces of what was the birth of cinema in the city. Whether in the current building of the fabric store located in the Historic Center or in the Colonial Cinema near Paseo de Bravo, this is a tour of some of the many old cinemas in Puebla capital.

Cinema in Puebla

The story begins in 1898 when Joaquín M. Prado, owner of a Lumiére cinematograph requested permits for the construction of the first cinema which consisted of a hall to install a cinematograph.

The cinema welcomed all audiences and surpassed the number of people who attended the theater, which was more expensive and required specific costumes.

This was how the cinema proliferated in Puebla, making more permits to install halls for this purpose were requested frequently.

In 1900, Sotero Espejel requested a permit -for one month- to exhibit a cinematograph in the Plazuela de San Luis. In 1908, Sotero Espejel requested a permit -for one month- to exhibit a cinematograph in the Plazuela de San Luis.

In 1908, Enrique Isunza, owner of the cinematograph company y Variedades, requested permission to install his tent in the Plazuela de San José and give functions for 2 months; it began on October 24 and charged 50 cents.

By 1918, there were 4 movie theaters in the city of Puebla:

  • Teatro Variedades (located on the former 12th street of Belisario Domínguez, now Av. 2 Poniente and 3 Norte).
  • Edén Parisiense (located on the former 4th street of Lafragua, in the Red, White and Green halls, now 3 Poniente)
  • Pathé in the first floor of the Hotel Arronte (in the former Pathé Street No. 2 at 3° de Mártires de Santa Clara No. 5, now Av. Juan de Palafox y Mendoza, number 219)
  • Cinema Palacio (at the former 10° Ignacio Zaragoza street)
  • Cinema Coliseo (located on the former 12th street of Belisario Domínguez, now Av. 2 Poniente and 3 Norte)
  • Cinema Coliseo (located on the former 12th street of Belisario Domínguez, now Av. 2 Poniente and 3 Norte)

Gran Teatro Variedades

It is the oldest cinema in the city. Founded in 1908, it caused a stir when it exhibited the film: Sombras de gloria, one of the first sound films and in Spanish.

Both Teatro Variedades and El Cine Coliseo closed their doors on February 21, 1988.

El Cine Coliseo

Its structure has endured and is still standing. It was inaugurated on September 14, 1939; it had a capacity of up to 2,500 people and had large screens to project the first Mexican films of the golden cinema.

Edén Parisiense

Its original name was El Parisián, but some time later it was changed to Edén Parisiense.

It was on Lafragua Street, today 3 Poniente and was known because there were 3 salons showing different movies.

Cine Colonial

This building retains its original architecture. It is a Californian colonial construction and it has been fought to preserve it and now it is a movie theater that shows movies for adults.

Pathé Salon

It was installed by Salvador Toscano and opened its doors in 1906 on Mercaderes Street, today known as 2 Norte, exhibiting the film: "A Trip to Paris".

Cine Reforma

Inaugurated on August 11, 1939, it was an icon of art deco, the work of architect José Fernández. Currently the building is occupied by an appliance store.

 

Translation done by: Karla Giselle Bonales Ramírez

 

 

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POB/LFJ