Gollete: the Bread of the Dead from Puebla

Gollete is a variety of "pan de muerto" (Bread of the Dead) from Puebla. Are essential and indispensable on the traditional altars on Day of the Dead.

Nota: Este contenido tiene una versión original en español

Gollete is a variety of "pan de muerto" (Bread of the Dead) from Puebla, according to the National Institute of Indigenous People (INPI), who described as a "colorful thread".

According to INPI, golletes are essential and indispensable on the traditional altars on Day of the Dead as salt, water, candles, copal, incense, marigolds flowers, and velvet flowers, bread, rucksack, izcuintle, and canes.

It is said that it originated in Puebla; however, it is not as elaborate, known, or traditional of state offerings.

Also, it is a salt's bread, as a cookie, because is  tougher and crunchier, and is spread with sugar and pink pigments.

In addition, INPI said golletes and canes are together in the altar, because golletes are placed on the canes. They are related with Tzompantli, a kind of altar where the heads of defeated enemies or sacrificed captives were impaled in order ro honor the gods.

It symbolizes a sacrificed head, and the cane, the stick used to cross the head.

 

Translation done by: Luba Michelle García Vega

 

 

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POB/LFJ